Log In

Inclusion Blog Post
By Inclusion Blog Post

SHARE
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Google+
Send Email


© 2019 THE INCLUSION BLOG. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
pills spilling out of a bottle

You can’t manage sick days

Management is what you do to things.

Leading is what you do with people.

Treating people like things never gets you far and does more harm than good.

For instance, one HR “best practice” is to require doctor’s notes for sickness. This practice is intended to ensure that each sickness is legitimate and that employees do not take advantage of sick leave. The thinking is “this is an important cost to manage so we must have a management process around it”.

The problems with this practice are:

  • Those that are lying about their sickness have no trouble getting a doctor’s note. Doctors are not trained in lie detection in strangers.
  • Those that are legitimately sick are inconvenienced at a time when they least need it (when they are sick), demoralizing them and reducing their engagement with your organization.
  • Our health care system is burdened with a totally unnecessary expense and our doctors and other professionals are forced to do our dirty work for us.

If your kid claims to be sick, do you send him to a walk in clinic to determine if you think he is faking or do you use your experience with the kid to figure out what is going on and make your best judgement?

Taken back into a workplace context: does an otherwise great employee suddenly start faking sickness? Unlikely. Does a demotivated person in a job they hate start abusing sick days? More likely. Leaders will look at the use of sick days, the employee involved, and then decide the course of action required in each specific situation.

Management is about making systems. Leadership involves making your best judgments and acting on them. Leaders treat “people” situations as they need to be treated because they know that there is no management system that works on people issues.

Thanks to Linton Sellen for inspiring this post.


Inclusion Blog Post

By Inclusion Blog Post

SHARE
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Google+
Send Email


© 2019 THE INCLUSION BLOG. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
Enjoyed this week’s blog? Subscribe to the Inclusion System Leadership Blog for great tips and insight right in your inbox! We publish new leadership and employee engagement content every week !!

Follow us on .

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

10 − 3 =

  1. I agree. Demanding a “sick” note really shows a paranoid attitude. Not every one is trying to get paid for doing nothing. Our justice system views people to be innocent until proven guilty. Routinely demanding a sick note shows the opposite mentality. It demonstrates that we do not have any trust in our staff but expect them to cheat and connive, to steal time and money. Unfortunately, this type of attitude tends to make people cheat just as a child who having been told repeatedly that they are bad, ends up being bad.