Log In

Darryl Stewart
By Darryl Stewart

SHARE
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Google+
Send Email


© 2019 THE INCLUSION BLOG. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
Can a boss really be a good coach to their staff?

Can a boss really be a good coach to their staff?

A reader recently reached out to me after reading one of my coaching blogs and questioned whether a boss could really be a good coach to the people they lead.

Here is an excerpt from the reader’s note:

“A boss and a coach are similar in that both want to see you succeed. The difference comes in that the boss wants to see results for the sake of the organization’s success, and a coach wants to see results for the sake of the individual. To me, a coach is someone who you can express problems to and get non-judgmental feedback from.” 

I understand this thinking and I agree that a “typical” boss is likely not going to be a great coach. This type of boss is thinking mostly about getting results through their people. Their main concern is how it will reflect on them if employees don’t perform. Their self-interest, inexperience with people, lack of humility –whatever you want to call it – makes it hard for them to be an effective coach. They care too much about the results and not enough about the people involved. I fell into this category myself early on in my leadership career.

On the other hand, the best leaders care just as much about the personal success of each staff member as they do about the results the person creates. And unlike the mythical non-judgmental coach my reader describes, they use their direct experience with the person to figure out how to help each person achieve success. In my mind, there is no coach more valuable than one who observes a person’s performance daily and gives caring feedback on how to get better. This coach is much more valuable than the one who listens “non-judgmentally” to someone’s interpretation of self and then tries to give objective guidance.

A good boss puts each staff member’s personal development on an equal footing with the results they create for the organization. That sort of boss is the best possible coach. This belief gets me out of bed every day. As a leader, I get to make a difference in the lives of the people I lead.

Enjoyed this week’s blog?
Subscribe to the Inclusion System Leadership Blog and receive our blogs right in your inbox! We publish new leadership and employee engagement content every week !!


Darryl Stewart

By Darryl Stewart

SHARE
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Google+
Send Email


© 2019 THE INCLUSION BLOG. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
Enjoyed this week’s blog? Subscribe to the Inclusion System Leadership Blog for great tips and insight right in your inbox! We publish new leadership and employee engagement content every week !!

Follow us on .

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

5 × one =

  1. Hi S, I sympathize with your situation. On the bright side there is hope for everyone. Personally my leadership has been below average at times in my career(s) and I would like to think I see the light when I go awry and steer myself back. Sometimes with the caring input of peers and occasionally even people who report to me. It is a brave sole who wades in those waters, only you can decide if that is right for you. One point – if you have people reporting to you, do your best to be a good leader despite the problems above you. You can choose your path, even if you are not properly supported from above and you can model what you wish you were seeing.

  2. What training would you recommend that the Boss could attend to learn about being a good leader and to care about how decisions affect the staff?
    It has been increasingly obvious that the Boss in our organization does not care about the staff and prefers to look the other way in hopes that any issues disappear. When I approached the Boss about some of the things that I have been experiencing, I was told that the company has gotten bigger and we have changed. It is sad to me that just because you get bigger, that the happiness of the staff is no longer important. So sad to see what I perceive as the demise of a company that once had really happy employees.