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Darryl Stewart
By Darryl Stewart

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© 2019 THE INCLUSION BLOG. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
Turning a B employee into an A employee

Turning a B employee into an A employee

If you are a workplace leader, you very likely have at least one employee you wish would turn it up a notch. They seem like they have the potential to excel, but something is just not clicking, and they are turning in a steady B performance.

In the right situation, you might see change if you move the person to a different role or switch up their duties a bit. This is reserved for when you think it is the work itself that is causing them to simply go through the motions. For instance, you might have someone training others when you think their real passion is doing the actual work, or vice versa. Teaching is not a passion for some, but it is a huge passion for others.

The key thing here is using your judgment about the person based on your discussions with them and your observations of their work. Leadership trainer Linton Sellen often asks the question: “Who knows better when the student pilot is ready to solo, the student or the instructor?” The answer of course is the instructor. We are not great judges of our own capabilities. It is easier for us to see the strengths and weaknesses of our staff than it is for them to see if for themselves. That is why coaching is so important, both for us and for them.

So, don’t ignore your spidey senses if they start telling you that someone might thrive if you change up their role. This just might be the key to solving the problem. If you have been coaching properly, you have already made it clear to the person that their performance is not what you want it to be. This change in roles can be introduced as a remedy.

There is a ton of research out there pointing to the high correlation between job performance and the person’s feeling that they are good at what they do. If you feel the B performance is happening because the person does not really like the work, you must act. Either move them or get them out of the organization.

We have changed people’s duties many times at the Inclusion System and it has succeeded more than it has failed. When you have a great person who you feel is worth it, this approach can be the deciding factor in elevating their performance and job satisfaction.

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Darryl Stewart

By Darryl Stewart

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© 2019 THE INCLUSION BLOG. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
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