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Darryl Stewart
By Darryl Stewart

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© 2019 THE INCLUSION BLOG. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

Stop with the performance reviews

Traditional performance reviews do more harm than good.

Do you think it is a good idea for parents to meet with each of their children regularly and rate them in all areas of their performance as children? 

Maybe it would look something like this:

  • Getting along with siblings – satisfactory 
  • Keeping room clean – needs improvement 
  • Interpersonal skills – above average 
  • Adaptable to changing family dynamics – needs improvement 
  • School marks – satisfactory 
  • Following established family procedures – needs improvement 
  • Results in extra-curricular activities – exceptional
  • KPI of reducing screen time by 10% over last quarter – on target
  • SMART goal of fighting with your sister less than once per week – not met

Following the performance management philosophies of some workplaces, after each child was so reviewed, allowance would be adjusted accordingly and goals for future allowance increases would be tied to improvement in key areas. And, of course, since there is a limited total budget for allowance, you would have to show greater improvement than your siblings in order to actually get an increase.

Do you think that this could lead to unhealthy rivalry between siblings? How about jealousy, discontent, a lack of teamwork, or even to sandbagging mom and dad and hiding the real problems while you do your best to pad your personal performance?

We wouldn’t do this in our home; we shouldn’t do it in our workplace. 

Great leaders meet one-on-one with their staff regularly and coach rather than do performance reviews. This past blog explains the philosophy and links to other resources on how to do it right:

The secret power of one-on-ones

Search “why performance reviews don’t work” in Google and you will find articles from Inc., Forbes, the Society for Human Resource Management, and many others that explain why the age-old performance review does not work and never did.

Let’s stop wasting time and let’s stop discouraging people by doing these reviews.


Darryl Stewart

By Darryl Stewart

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© 2019 THE INCLUSION BLOG. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
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